Workshops and Panels

Workshops and Panels

Telehealth Interactive Panel Session: Telehealth Q&A:  Are we there yet?

Led by Tim Kelsey, CEO Australian Digital Health Agency and Marianne St Clair, Northern Institute CDU with Lucy Facaro, Yogi Kanagasingam, Marianne Wood, Michelle McGuirke,  Laura Prado, Beth Sperring.

No presentations are avialable

 

Education Interactive Panel Session: Demands on online services by students engaging in and building, new interactive technologies in learning.

Allistair Campbell, Edith Cowan University, Leigh Howser, Cairns School of Distance Education, Jan Clarke, Independent Schools of WA,  Roxanne Morrissey, Isolated Children’s Parents Association

Some presentations contained images of children using computers and were not made publically available.

 

Remote Training Access and Delivery Focus Panel: Wicked Problems in Training Delivery in Remote Areas: Partnering with RTOS to Bridge the Digital Divide and Employing ICT Coordinators in Communities.

Graham Townley, Brad Kelly, Paupiyala Tjarutja Aboriginal Corporation (Tjuntjuntjara), Phillip Wyles, Department of Training and Workforce Development, WA, Leigh Howser, Cairns School of Distance Education

Technical Workshop 1: Technoswap – The Nuts and Bolts of providing technical Services to Connect Remote Communities.

Rongomai Bailey, NG Media, Ben Pridmore, IRCA, Stephen Wyndham, Managing Director, Biz365

Practical Workshop on your phone:  AppBooks -Self Publish Apps – Without having to keep going back to the developer. Learn about app development and build a take away 2-3 examples. Build an app. Led by Warren Smith, and Ryan Garland Inyerpocket Software.

Expert Panel Emergency Services: New technologies make a real-time emergency safer – analyzing a series of examples. Examples and discussion by Rob Stirling, Syd Bignall,Superintendent Operational Communications, Emergency Services Complex, Department of Fire and Emergency Services; Lyn Craige, Chair East Pilbara Shire,  Martin Laverty (RFDS CEO), and Lalla Mackenzie (nbn co).

RRRC Workshop: Hosted by ACCAN

The Customer Service Guarantee for voice and data.

The Regional, Rural and Remote Communications Coalition (RRRCC) was formed to highlight concerns about the lack of equitable access to reliable and quality telecommunications services. Today, a reliable internet service is just as important as a reliable voice service. This interactive workshop, facilitated by ACCAN, will focus on the limitations of the Customer Service Guarantee Standard, which currently only applies to telephone services.

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Telehealth Q&A:  Are we there yet?

 Tim Kelsey, CEO, Australian  Digital Health Agency and Marianne St Clair Northern Institute.

Panel Members Include: Lucy Facaro, Yogi Kanagasingam, Marianne Wood, Nicole Marchant, Michelle McGuirke,  Laura Prado, Beth Sperring.

No presentations available.

Adopting telehealth enabled models of care is often associated with a number of benefits, including improved access to effective, timely and sustainable health services. These benefits are appealing in a decentralized environment that is challenged by a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and demands for healthcare. How are we going about realising the benefits and delivering equitable access to care in rural and remote Australia?

Telehealth for remote health service provision is recognised both locally and internationally as an innovative way to deliver improved health services to remote and regional areas.  This session will discuss the current state of Telehealth in Australia, considering both the achievements and challenges yet to be addressed.  Telehealth is a complex collaborative method of delivering health services that has the potential to provide primary health, allied health and emergency care. Telehealth needs to be integrated into provision of services to remote locations but it is not a complete solution – it needs to be integrated into current programs of service. do


Education Panel : Demands on online services by students engaging in and building, new interactive technologies in learning

Alistair Campbell, Edith Cowan University, Leigh Howser, Cairns School of Distance Education, Jan Clarke, Independent Schools of WA,  Roxanne Morrissey, Isolated Children’s Parents Association

Use of Information and Communications Technology is changing in schools. Schools are helping their students to not only be powerful users of high-end technologies but to become the “Makers” of technologies, within all curriculum areas. This is complemented by the implementation of the new National Technologies Curriculum, which encourages children to understand coding, database design, robotics and a range of high-end applications. Our expert panel will provide examples of the applications you can expect children in your community to be exploring. They will explain why the new Technology Curriculum is encouraging the next generation of Australian IT professionals and supporting the demand for many expert professionals across regional and rural economies. This impacts on families and communities and what stories they tell their children about learning and what is being learned. They will talk about what it is like to be a teacher of technologies, a parent of children learning about new technologies and a system trying to provide equitable access to learning.  The new educational directions add to the demand for better cheaper broadband in regional, rural and remote communities for children. Together the panel and audience will discuss “How can we ensure children from the bush are getting the same digital opportunities as those in cities?

 


REMOTE TRAINING ACCESS AND DELIVERY FOCUS         

Wicked Problems in Training Delivery in Remote Areas: Partnering with RTOS to Bridge the Digital Divide and Employing ICT Coordinators in Communities

Graham Townley, Brad Kelly, Paupiyala Tjarutja Aboriginal Corporation (Tjuntjuntjara)

Phillip Wyles, Department of Training and Workforce Development, WA

Leigh Howser, Cairns School of Distance Education

The cost of outreach training in IT and computer learning via State TAFEs and RTOs is too expensive for many remote communities (Not-for-Profit Aboriginal Corporations managing remote communities) and, in many cases, doesn’t happen at all, largely because of the cost of remote travel and difficulties in adopting delivery models designed for accredited training in regional and metropolitan areas. Governments (State and Commonwealth) invest in infrastructure but how do communities employ local digital inclusion workers and educators to train, support and empower community members in a Knowledge Economy?  Governments (State and Commonwealth) and remote communities support CRCs, media hubs and telecommunications but local communities located far from regional centres need to bridge the digital divide by employing local educators with the required technical skills and qualifications (Cert IV Training & Assessment) to deliver accredited training outcomes with RTOs under feasible auspicing arrangements.

Innovative approaches are needed to achieve last year’s Big Idea 3 at the Broadband for the Bush Conference in Brisbane. The aim was to employ digital inclusion workers in remote communities for 2 years who can build local capacity and provide the technical and training support needed! Solutions to wicked problems in training delivery can be found but they require interagency coordination and partnerships with industry, external service providers and local employers to work.


Technical Workshop 1: Technoswap – The Nuts and Bolts of providing technical Services to Connect Remote Communities.

Rongomai Bailey, NG Media, Ben Pridmore, IRCA, Stephen Wyndham, Managing Director, Biz365

This informal workshop allows Technical and Systems Staff/individuals to share technical information about connectivity trials, networking breakthroughs and existing frustrations and solutions. Providers, suppliers of systems, technical staff from telecommunications projects remote organisations are invited to share knowledge and seek solutions and ideas of better ways to do things.


Practical Workshop on your phone: AppBooks -Self Publish Apps – Without having to keep going back to the developer. Learn about app development and build a take away

Warren Smith, Ryan Garland, Inyerpocket Software

Our session starts by explaining our journey so far. Describing some of the challenges that face remote communities who want to adapt new technology as a way to preserve culture and language and share stories. Ryan and I will show the delegates a current working project with ARA Iritija in the APY Lands as a model. We will also show a range of other products that have been developed to inspire you. We will demonstrate how we’ve built the B4B App and will make some live updates during the session.

The workshop show you how to upload images and audio, how to add text from other sources, how to use design templates, how to create basic navigation, how to collaborate with others before you publish, and then how to publish and share. We will show how the App works offline but will sync new updates when they are back in a connected environment.


New technologies make a real-time emergency safer – analyzing a series of examples

Examples and discussion by Rob Stirling, Syd Bignall,Superintendent Operational Communications, Emergency Services Complex, Department of Fire and Emergency Services; Lyn Craige, Chair East Pilbara Shire, Martin Laverty (RFDS CEO), and Lalla Mackenzie (nbn co).

This expert panel add a dimension to the forum addressing guidelines for remote safety, regional and remote planning for emergency situations and the impact of connectivity on how communities, families and emergency services can work together. They will bring inspiring stories from the RFDS about how access to real time data and diagnosis in the air and on the ground, is saving lives and resources. They will discuss how emergency services procedures and processes are changing faster than the connectivity allows.  Access to real time information, using GPS based devices and the lessons about how build up and access to real time information is part of the new ways emergences are managed. They will unpack the elements of the Congress of Remote Area Nurses Associations (CRANA) Guidelines, that tell a story about the demands for connectivity and the devices which provide it in real time.

These stories add to the arguments for the best broadband, for communities, Local Governments in regions and the myriad of regional businesses. The stories also illustrate that a suite of technologies may need to be part of the solution. The panel will discuss affordability, quality of devices and connections, the importance of the “human element” and the pros and cons of solutions, in the context of emergency services. They will both inform the audience of the latest thinking but also help the audience undertake emergency planning by knowing more about the technologies and their limitations and benefits in our patchy networks servicing the bush.


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